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HISTORY, LEGENDS & MYTHS CHANNELS
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This is intended as a growing, living archive, therefore if you have any corrections or articles that you would liike to contribute please feel free to email us

The Sea Lion of Silver Islet
(Sleeping Giant Provinicial Park)

Visit the little Silver Islet resort and the spirit of the "Native" can be felt in every corner. Silver Islet is not only beautifully picturesque, but leaves one with a sense of having actually having met with the chiefs and braves that once roamed its shores


The great stone Sea-Lion, is always of interest to visitors as is the legend of its origin. Pet and companion of Nanabijou, Spirit of the Deep Sea Water, was the giant Thunder Bird. Legend has it that lightning came from its eyes and its voice was the thunder.


You can believe this when you hear the storms of Thunder Bay, and you know that the ancient Natives knew very little of the real reason for thunder and lightning.


The Lion, "Nagochee" was a great companion of Nanabijou. however Nagochee was no ordinary creature, he had the wings of an eagle and the feet of a duck, the speed of the wind and he was capable of swimming faster than the greatest of fish.


The Spirit God was going on a long journey he mounted his great beast and in haste departed forgetting to take his Thunder Bird. Feeling unwanted she became very bitter and plotted to destroy Nagochee.


She started to screech when she saw him appearing over the clouds. Her voice shaking the heavens and causing a terrific storm, striking the Lion and rider with its full force, snapping off one of Nagochee's wings causing him to throw his Master into the Big Sea Water.


The Lion tried in vain to swim to Nanabijou's aid but the waves were too much. Nanabijou finally reached the shore on his own efforts and thinking his beast had failed him, turned him to stone. To this day, stands the faithful old Nagochee, looking out to the water, waiting for his master to return.